Proactive vs. Reactive

IDENTIFYING THE UNDERLYING ISSUES

DID YOU KNOW...

”20% of you ages 13-18 live with a mental health condition.”
— National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)
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Monitor Students

Screening for mental health conditions in students can identify possible issues that can be addressed early before spiraling into something more.

Screen Early And Often

Web-based assessments that can be administered from any computer in school. Assessments are scored immediately and loaded into the Online Results Portal.

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Detect Early

Early detection of mental health conditions can lead to coping mechanisms and help students later in adulthood.

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Being Proactive

Being reactive is practicing active shooter drills. Being proactive is addressing a mental health condition before it leads the would-be shooter to act out.

DID YOU KNOW...

90% of youth suicides (ages 10-24) had an underlying mental illness.
— National Alliance of Mental Illness

Mental Health Facts for Children and Teens

Recently, the National Alliance of Mental Illness released a fact sheet on mental illness within children and teens.
Click here to download.


Need a resource for your child or teens substance abuse disorder?

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Need more help and resources? Check out Addiction Is Real, a 501c3 helping children and teens with substance abuse disorders. Addiction is Real helps educate parents on the dangers of drugs and alcohol, and provide them with the tools needed to guide and engage their children through this very rough and sensitive terrain?
Read more here…


What is SBIRT?

SCREENING, BRIEF INTERVENTION, REFERRAL TO TREATMENT

  • School counselors will have immediate access to Student Mental Health assessment results through the online portal.

  • All six assessments (ADHD, depression, anxiety, substance abuse, suicide risk and eating disorders) are scored individually.

  • If a student scores poorly on any of the six assessments, school counselors can then schedule a follow up meeting with the student or the parents to address current issues.

  • If necessary, the counselor can then refer the student to a mental health professional for diagnosis and treatment.

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